About remadepreacher

Kent Dickerson is a Christian writer, teacher, singer and lecturer. He calls his blog, “Remade Preacher”. The reason why that title was chosen was because God brought him back to full time ministry after leaving it for thirty years. The primary reason for leaving Pastoral Ministry was a deep-seated struggle with pornography. He facilitates two seminars. -Spiritual Battle Plan, The Path To Victory and -Spiritual Battle Plan, the Armor Of God. In both courses he calls upon men to first get into the battle against the sin in their lives and then to find new ways to call upon the Almighty God to lead, strengthen and protect them. He also emphasizes helping each other as brothers. In addition, versions of Spiritual Battle Plan are being developed for both men and women learners. A new class/seminar, Be Transformed, is now available as well. During the “Be Transformed” Seminar Kent teaches the art of analyzing one’s thinking patterns in order to allow renewing-of-the-mind transformation so that one can then devote one’s time to contemplating God. Kent is currently authoring a book tentatively titled, “Remade! A preacher finds victory over pornography and complaint.” He is also working on recording his first EP and videos Kent is from Abilene, Texas where he attended Abilene Christian University. He currently lives in Pyeongtaek, South Korea as part of the U.S. military community.

Come with me and rest

Sunday I had the opportunity to preach and spoke on Meditation. I decided yesterday to follow it up with some lessons on walking with God.

This morning I was reading a bit that fits right in this plan from Firstlights by Sue Monk Kidd. She talks of the need to stop in our day for a few moments and be present with God. She then brings up a passage I didn’t remember, “Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.” (Mark 6:31 NIV) This verse is tucked in just before Jesus feeds the five thousand.  The disciples had come back from being sent off two by two to preach repentance, heal, and cast out demons. They no doubt were still pretty excited when they got back. But Jesus could tell they had not even had time to eat. He then invites them to come along with him to rest. They did not really get the chance as the crowd followed them. But they did have a pretty amazing meal.

Mrs. Kidd points out that the difference between nowhere and now here is a small space. We really need to take moments through our day to be truly present, not just rushing through our to do list. We take these moments to recognize God is with us. If we don’t the day will seem a blur. We may miss lessons of the day or God speaking to us in a small voice. God does remind us to “be still and know I am God.” (Psalm 46:10)

 

Jesus, light of the World

During the Christmas season I reflected on Jesus coming as the light of the world (John 8:12; 9:5; 12:46). I thought of how many songs and decorations are associated with light. In all the darkness of the world, we need his light.

Today I read a thought connecting theology and science by Andy Walsh in a blog on Jesus Creed called “It Is All Relative”. He points out that there are many principles in science which are constant. One is the speed of light in a  vacuum, about 300 million meters per second. This is true regardless of the relative speed of the one seeing the light. The only objects which can actually move at the speed of light are things without mass, such as protons.

Much of our society today is preaching that all morals and truths are relative. They do not understand how Christians believe in absolutes. That is because they do no know Jesus. He is our absolute, our constant in goodness, truth and morals. Though he was tempted in the same ways we are, he remained sinless (Hebrews 4:15). This makes him the only one who, morally speaking moves at the speed of light (without the weight of sin). Our goal is to “walk in the light as he is in the light” 1 John 1:7.

The Lord is a Warrior

Ex. 15-3

We live in a time of the church being under constant attack. The religious war with Muslims seems to gain new footing every week. More Christians are being persecutioned than any time in history. The political upheaval, in our own country and abroad has us reeling — everything seems to be turning upside down. So many proponents of relativism, “alternative lifestyles”, athiesm, agnosticism and freedom from religion are pointing thier fingers at the church and saying we are the problem. We are loosing our young people at an astounding rate — more churches are closing than ever before — most of us can’t believe all of this is happening in our own time.

Add this to the “normal” strife in the church caused by gossip, backbiting, prideful leadership, unrepentant sin, and lack of respect for the scriptures — it seems the enemy is mostly winning and many are despairing.

But — remember, “The Lord is a warrior,  Yahweh, is his name.” Exodus 15:3 reminds us of of the plagues in Egypt and the Red Sea crashing down on the Egyption army. He has all power in his control, including myriads of angels, a single one of which killed 185,000 men in a single day in 2 Kings 19.

Do not fear! Jehovah will fight for us! Call on his name, seek his face, meditate on his eternal nature, read and remember the many, many examples in scripture of his overcoming overwhelming odds for his people and you will see — it is far from hopeless — not only do we need not despair, we can shout Hallelujah!

On No! What do I do, part 2

  1. Don't panicSit down daily to read the Bible, ask God to lead you to just the right passage for this moment. Sometimes, I have had the Bible fall open to that right passage. Other times I just start looking at the Psalms and find it. Most often, however, the Lord brings to mind just what I need from past reading or study.

 

As you read the passage, ask what it reveals about God’s nature and character.

 

Reflect on God, ask him to show you more of this.

 

Meditate on it. (Psalms 119:15) But, you may ask, how do you meditate

 

  1. Put away the cell phone, the laptop, anything that might distract you. They used to call meditation — musing and a muse was someone wise. Now these have been almost completely replaced with the opposite — amusement.
  2. Spend a significant time just reflecting, listening to what God may be telling you.
  3. If possible, engage your mind’s eye — your imagination
  4. Find pictures, songs, messages to further encourage this thinking. Put these reminders in your day.

 

Ask God if there is any action you need to take to demonstrate what you have learned — to take on his nature yourself. If so, act as soon as possible.  And follow up — see if you’ve been faithful to do God’s will for you in this.

 

Ask God if there is any action you need to take to demonstrate what you have learned — to take on his nature yourself. If so, act as soon as possible.  And follow up — see if you’ve been faithful to do God’s will for you in this.

Oh, No! What do I do?

home alone

 

Last time, we looked at the problem of responding to our concerns with anxiety and how this response does not reflect faith or lead to mental health. So what is the correct response?

 

  1. Realize Christians are not exempt from genuine concerns. Wars or rumors of war, other political concerns, worries over our children, concern for aging parents, health issues, work troubles and money troubles happen to us as well as unbelievers.
  2. Pray — this should always be our default setting, as Christians. Pray for all those involved in our concerns, even our enemies. (Matt. 5:44)

 

  1. Share your concerns with fellow Christians. We recently sang the old hymn, Tell It to Jesus in early morning prayers. The song recommends always going to Jesus with our troubles — which is good. But it also recommends we tell it to Jesus alone. But as Christians, we are also to follow Galatians 6:2. “Bear one another’s burdens and thereby fulfill the law of Christ.” We may think we are sparing someone our trouble, if we keep it to ourselves. But actually, we are robbing them of a privilege and an opportunity to show Christ’s love to us. Another thing our silence robs us of — wise counsel. Proverb seek Wise counsel.

 

  1. Pray for strength, courage, and faithfulness through whatever you are going through. (Joshua 1:9; Rev. 2:10) Voice of the Martyrs says this is usually the top prayer request from those facing serious persecution.

 

5. Continually pray for direction on how to handle every situation. This is a discipline that most of us need to learn — to insert quick prayers through out the day or night whenever our thought turn to a concern.

Dreaming about eternal life

New Heaven and Earth mergeIn a recent post, I dealt with resurrection and the powerful prayer in Ephesians 1. The passage makes clear the power of the resurrection working in us brings assurance of our hope in eternal life. But eternal life may not be what you think it will be.

Some people think that going to heaven is mostly about going to a place — seeing the streets of gold and pearly gates. But Jesus says in his wonderful prayer for his followers in John 17:1-3 “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son that the Son may glorify you, since you have given him authority over all flesh, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.” Eternal life is not mostly about going to a place. It is about knowing the Father and the Son — being in greater relationship with them. All the things that distract us from this now will be over.  All the limitations we have now in truly experiencing their glory and understanding them will fade away.

What do you think this will look like in heaven? I hope we can have a conversation about this.

Living in South Korea

Featured

azaelas in Gunpo, Seoul

We moved here directly from Germany. We immediately noticed quite a difference. We stayed in Seoul several days before heading to U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys. There were signs of poverty, fairly regular, in both the city and the countryside. The streets were far less clean in places. The crowds were much greater than we had ever experienced (we could not believe how many Koreans would cram into a elevator). But there was beauty, too. The azaleas came out that week.

We appreciated the friendliness of the people and the really different food — though a lot is too hot for me. We’ve learned to really love the people.

Before coming, we wondered how Koreans would react to trouble with the North. Most of the time, I would compare it to people in Central and North Texas being told there was a Tornado warning.  They just said, “OK” and went about their business — just used to it. Tell them a tornado has been sighted 5 miles away and you have their attention.

As I write this, there is more concern. North Korea has had several nuclear tests recently and tests of longer reaching missiles. Couple this with the local political scene being unstable at the moment and a new U.S. President and tensions are high.

Right now I need to check my NEO bag and put it in the car. I need to travel to another base and think I’ll take it with me, this time. It needs to be ready at all times, in case they evacuate non-essential Americans with the military community. It contains a few pieces of clothing, a gas mask, bottled water, snacks, and a lot paper work, which includes my marriage certificate and my last will and testament. The training has prepared us to drop everything and walk, not drive, to the building on base we are to gather in such circumstances and prepare to helicopter out of here. Training even included a thirty minute ride in one of these, a CH-47 Chinook, which turns out to be the fastest of the locally based helicopters. If we ever need it, we’ll appreciate that. CH-47 Chinook

Next post we’ll explore our reactions to dangerous times.